How to Care for a Philodendron Plant

Posted on Posted in Gardening

philodendron plant caring forCommonly kept indoors as a houseplant, philodendron plants are easy to care for, and come in many different shapes, sizes, and varieties. Like most other plants that originated from tropical America, the philodendron enjoys bright, filtered light, or low light. Their broad waxy leaves cannot handle full direct sun, and require a place inside the home that gets bright light out of direct sun. They can, however, survive in areas of the home with lower light also, but will not thrive in areas that are too lowly lit. Like most tropical plants, they enjoy an area where there is enough light for you to read comfortable without straining your eyes.

To water your philodendron, it is important that you do not water over the plant, and that you avoid getting the leaves too wet during watering. Wet leaves can rot and disease can form, so it is best to gently lift the foliage up and water around the base of the plant. The soil can become somewhat dry between watering, but it is important to make sure that they are not dried out too often because their growth can be stunted, and they may lose some of their foliage. Try to keep the soil evenly moist, and ensure that there is no excess water building up in the base of the pot.

More about the philondendron-plant.pdf

The ideal temperature for a philodendron plant is a bit warmer than room temperature, or 75-85°F (24-30°C), but can tolerate lower indoor temperatures too. They can be fertilized in the spring and mid summer with a general liquid indoor houseplant fertilizer. You will want to regularly wash the leaves of your philodendron plant as soon as you see dust building up, to ensure that the pores of the leaves do not become clogged and that your plant can breathe more easily.

If you need more plant advice contact the Landscapers in Frisco

2 thoughts on “How to Care for a Philodendron Plant

  1. I know from experience these plants take some extra care if you want to keep them looking good (and alive). My mom had a lot of house plants and unfortunately, a Philodendron she asked me to take care of. I basically did everything opposite of what the article mentioned (especially watering the leaves) and I still don’t know how I didn’t kill it. This is helpful advice and I might get one now that I know how to care for it properly.

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